STAGING/TIME LINE/THE PLAN

When your season begins and ends, is usually based on temperatures.The earlier you can get outside to start vegging and longer you can flower, will give you the length of your season.

Once you’ve determined your number of harvests, you will be able to calculate how many plants you will need for the season. As well as, how much work you are going to have to do, when to take starts, transplanting, and harvest.

The plan with light dep is to get multiple harvests in a season. Two or three harvests can be achieved by scheduling in your harvests dates. You want to start with your last harvest NOT the first one. The reason for this, once you know when your end date is for your 2nd run you can work backwards for when you need to transplant for the 2nd run. This also means you know when you need to harvest the 1st run in order to be able to start the second round. This also means that you will know when you need to transplant your 2nd run and when you need to harvest your 1st run.

With your final harvest date chosen you can set some of the major milestone markers on your calendar. Now you need to fill in the other major milestones, but you will need some information first…

Now you literally have all the key information to set yourself up for major success for the 1st run. By working backward you know when you need to take your cuttings. You know how many you need and how long to grow them before transplanting.

llie great news about making a plan is you only have to do it once in the beginning ot the year. If you nail the plan and pull off what you wanted you can use the same plan again next vear. However, if you were unable to make the plan work this season, then next season you can revise it and update it. l'his will make you a better grower next season and in the vears to come.

ih e first thing you need to determine in your plan is how many harvests do you want to do this upcoming season? Once you have determined exacdy how many harvests you want to pull off you will be able to calculate how many plants you will need, how much work you are going to have to do, when to start cuttings, when to transplant, and when to harvest. Of course a lot more will go into it than this, but you get the idea.

Something to consider is this: the more harvests that you want to pull in one season the more money you will have to spend up front. Assuming everything is in place such as infrastructure, soil and frames you will still need to spend money on either buying clones or making them. You will need to buy fertilizers and all sorts of little shit. No matter how well you plan vou will always need to make a run to the store for something at least once a week. Stuff breaks, vou run out of something, or as you go along you see ways to improve upon what you built in the first place. Hence the visits to the store.

Make sure that you set aside some money to deal with these early and late season

problems because they will happen.
Once you have determined how manv runs you want to pull off you need to establish a

timeline. To establish a timeline vou will need to create a work calendar. On this calendar you will have your start times and harvest times. Seems pretty simple and for the most part it is. The complex part is how many different things that you will have to be doing day in and dav out. If you don’t write it down on a calendar there is no way you will be able to keep track of everything that needs to get done, and done on time.

Time is the real problem here. If you are trying to pull otf two or more harv ests in a year then you need to make the basic assumption that time is working against you. Not only is it working against you but you are already behind schedule. This is the mindset that you must have to reallv kick ass.

You can’t afford to be lackadaisical with what needs to get done because every day that you put something off is a week that it puts you behind. If you slack just a little bit before you know it the season is over and you will have only accomplished a fraction of your goals. So buck up, cowbov, and get your nose to the grindstone.

Growing weed, contrary to popular belief, is hard work. I mean hard work in the true sense of the word. You are a farmer. This means you need to haul soil around, move plants, transplant, water, prune, feed your plants, protect your plants from predators and all sorts of other shit.

I am not saying this to scare you, I am just telling you the truth you already know. Growing weed ain’t for the lazy people. Not if you want to really succeed at it.

To really be able to fill in your calendar you need to schedule in your harvests dates. For the ease of explanation let’s assume that you are going to try to pull off three harvests. This is always where you start. You want to start with your last harvest NOT the first one. There is a simple reason for this. Once you know when your end date is for your 3rd run you can calculate backwards in time when you need to transplant for the 3rd run. This also means you know when you need to harvest the 2nd run in order to be able to start the 3rd run. This also means that you will know when you need to transplant your 2nd run and when you need to harvest your 1st run. But wait- there’s more. This also means that you will know when you need to transplant your 1st run into the dep. Now you see why you need to not only figure out how many runs you want to do but also when you want to harvest your last run.

With your final harvest date chosen you can set some of the major milestone markers on your calendar. Now you need to fill in the other major milestones, but you will need some information first...

If you are buying clones make sure that you place your order far out in advance. Also, please follow up on the status of your clone order. This is not something that vou want to overlook because if your clones aren’t ready on time you are in big trouble!

If you are taking your own clones you need to be able to figure out how long it takes from cutting a clone to a fully rooted clone. The simple answer is anywhere from 10 to 21 days. I have had clones root in 10 days and I have had clones root in 21 days. A lot of this depends on the technique you use and the plant variety that you use.

'Hiere are a lot of great cloning techniques out there. You need to do some serious research unless you already have a good technique. In my opinion a good technique needs to have the following qualities: repeatable, fast, easy, and low maintenance.

I know that sounds like a lot to ask but, trust me, it is not. I have seen at least 10 different cloning techniques fulfill all of those criteria. Granted, I have been around awhile. Pretty much all of the techniques out there are very similar. So find one that works for vou and master it. Don’t try to create shortcuts. Just repeat what you learned and you will probably be good to go.

Varieties do play a big role in how long a cutdng will take to root. Most green weed will root in 10 to 14 days. OG’s on the other hand can be exceptionally hard to root. If you are making your own clones and haven’t mastered how to clone OG you may want to sdek to an easier variety' to clone unul you get more experience with the OG. If you are depending on the clones that you are making and they don’t root you are fucked. You should grow and clone something you know that you can easily get to root. Try some Sour Diesel instead, lliat is a fairly easy variety to root and everybody loves Sour DH

ITie point here is it takes 10 to 21 days to root a cutdng. I always assume that it will take 21 days when I schedule my calendar out. Remember our assumption that time is against you and it is later than you think.

If a cutdng takes 21 days to root how long does it take a rooted clone to get to transplant size? Idat is a great question. Depending on the variety, light intensity7, pot size, and vigor of the plant it will take approximately 5 weeks to get your rooted clone to transplant size. Transplant size is approximately 18 inches tall and 12 inches wide.

Ofcourse, there are certain assumptions that I am making. Here are my assumptions: healthv clone, ample light, 1 gallon pot, adequate feeding, and a good watering schedule. When you transplant vour clone I am assuming that the clone has a decent root system. Nothing crazily over developed and nothing under developed. The assumption is that you will actually see a couple of roots sticking out of the media.

You should be transplanting into a 1 gallon pot. This allows your clone to freely grow some good roots without worrying about getting root bound. A 1 gallon pot is ideal in my opinion versus a 4 inch pot because you won’t have to transplant from the 4 inch to a 1 gallon. You should just save yourself some work and plant directly into the 1 gallon pot. The

1 gallon pot will give your plant enough soil to grow into a good size plant which is 18 inches tall and 12 inches wide.

Obviously your plants will need several hours of light a day to do this and they must never experience more than 6 hours of uninterrupted darkness. This will keep them in a nice vegetative state. Additionally, they will also need at least 6 hours of high intensity light daily to be able to grow at a rate that will get them to size in 5 weeks. You need to figure out how vour plants are going to be able to get that 6 hours or more of high intensity light. You can grow them indoors or vou can grow them in a greenhouse with some lights. Whatever method vou choose is okay as long as you get it done.

During the 5 week period of growth make sure to feed your plants and water them appropriatelv. 1f you are really on it you can spray them once a day with kelp. Spraying your plants really does increase the growth rate. I have seen a side by side experiment and the difference after 21 davs was shocking. Hie side that was being sprayed daily was on average 5 inches taller!

So here we are. We took the cuttings and they took 3 weeks to root. Then we transplanted the clone into a 1 gallon pot and let it grow under high intensity light for five weeks. We now have a plant that is 18 inches tall and 12 inches wide and ready to transplant into its final location.

That was a total of 8 weeks from cutting to transplant ready. Basically it took two months to get vour plants where they needed to be. Did you think it would take that long? Or did vou think it would take longer? Either way, here we are.

With the knowledge that is going to take two months to get your plants ready to transplant and an additional week for them to get established once transplanted you can now fill in the rest of the major mile markers for each run. At this point it should be pretty easy to do. If you want a shortcut you can visit my website and I’ll give you a free copy of my Light Dep Harvest Calendar. The only caveat is the calendar was designed with 8 wecker strains in mind.

You can grab your copy of the calendar at humboldtlightdep.com/resources

The important thing to remember with these assumptions is plant density. I am assuming that you will be planting plants approximately 18 to 24 inches apart when you plant them in the light dep. litis will help you to figure out exactly how many starts you are going to need to get through each run.

After you have calculated how many plants you are going to need for each run you will need to make sure that you have enough space to grow your plants up to size in the 1 gallon pots. If we are shooting for each 1 gallon pot to take up 1 foot in diameter when it’s ready for transplanting then that means you can only fit 100 plants in a 10 foot by 10 foot space. I know- that’s a lot of space for such a small amount of plants.

But it is verv important to give your plants the space they need to grow so that thev can actually achieve the size that you are going to need.

O f course when you first transplant them into the 1 gallon pot you can pack them in super tight. As they grow it is very important to start spacing them out so that they can get the light that they need. When you create the proper staging/growing area for your plant requirements you will make your life a lot easier by having a location that will be used again and again.

This is a very important aspect of growing or building your plants to size that you need to consider and account for. Because if your plants can’t get to the size you need them, when you need them, then you are not going to achieve the goals you have set for yourself. You may need to build a temporary greenhouse or rent a room to get your plants to size.

Now you literally have all the key information to set yourself up for major success for the 1st run. By working backward you know when you need to take your cuttings. You know how many you need and how long to grow them before transplanting.

After creating your calendar you will also know when you need to do all those steps for the 2nd and 3rd run! I hope you see why it is so important that you actually write this down on a calendar- because there really is a lot to keep track of and it would be so easy to forget just one step.

Can you imagine if you forgot to take your cuttings on time and were two weeks late? Can you see how that would really put a massive wrench in your plans? I have done exactly that in the past, 'lliat is why I use a calendar for scheduling. I know what works and when to do it. I don’t need to worn- or think about it too much because my trusty external hard drive (the calendar) is right there reminding me what to do at the appropriate time!

If you don’t like the idea of running small plants as I suggested all you need to do is add a week or two to the five weeks ofvegetative growth and your plants will get a lot bigger. Of course if you grow your plants much longer than five weeks in a 1 gallon pot your plants will more than likely get root bound. This means if you want them a bit bigger, you would be better off using a 2 gallon pot instead of a 1 gallon pot. This also means that you will need more area to grow your plants to the size that you want them. None of this is a problem as long as you account for it in your plan.


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